Circle The Circus in the Grove – A Conversation With … Steven Aramini

  I’m BACK! And now a proud member of The Indie Game Report network. This time out I’m talking to Steven Aramini. Steven is the hot designer at the moment. He just had TWO successful Kickstarters (Barker’s Row and Circle The Wagons) and two more going on right now (Groves and Coin & Crown). Steven and I have a real nice talk about those games and some of his game design philosophy. I hope you enjoy it.

Fairway Thoughts: Grove’s Bag Building

Today, Fairway reflects on the very clever “Bag Building” game mechanism used by co-contributors Steven Aramini and Dan Letzring in their upcoming Kickstarter game, Groves. This peculiar variation on the common deck-building or deck-optimization mechanisms results in some fantastic game play. So fantastic, it’s worth exploring in a bit more detail.

Cassie’s Learn to Play: Groves

Welcome to the learn to play video for the new game Groves from Letiman Games. If you would like to jump to a particular section, the time stamps for each are listed below. Introduction: 0:27 Setup and Overview: 1:19 Round Examples: 8:36   To learn more about Groves and the Kickstarter campaign, visit: https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/220155/groves http://www.tinyurl.com/grovesks If you’re interested in learning about having a Learn to Play video made for your game, please visit my inquiry page here. Find us everywhere! www.TheIndieGameReport.com Facebook.com/TheIGReport Twitter: @TheIGReport Music Intro and outro: Rainbow Street by Scott Holmes Playthrough: Toys by Steve Combs

Designing Micro: Or All About Creating a Game Experience That Delivers More With Less

The golden poison frog. The deathstalker scorpion. The Irukandji jellyfish. What do they have in common? They’re all ridiculously small…and all incredibly deadly. It just goes to show you that Mother Nature can conjure up some pretty powerful creatures in little packages. The same can be true of tabletop games. In the past, small box games with very few components generally meant that players were in store for a less engaging experience. Microgames have come a long way since those days, however, as gamers now have several great options that deliver in big ways. Perhaps no game has had more impact on the microgame genre than AEG’s “Love Letter,” which came out in 2012. In “Love Letter,” you take on the role of a suitor trying to woo the princess by delivering a love letter to her. The only catch is that all of your opponents are attempting the same…